YOU SHOULD TRY YOUR BEST TO UNDERSTAND WHAT CANNOT BE UNDERSTOOD

Cyrus Daily Messages

I will now (May 1958) explain what cannot be explained. You should try your best to understand what cannot be understood.

Here is Beryl. You, Beryl, are the Infinite Ocean, but as a drop  of that Ocean, you have three layers. You see, hear and smell, do this and do that, not from within, but through your eyes, your nose, your outer layers [five senses]. That which you see is from the outer layer of your Infinite Self of which you are the drop. Beryl does not see the Infinite through the outer layer of her senses. Beryl uses energy, becomes active and so forth. That is not you, you do not go anywhere, you are infinite. It is the drop that sees and moves, and as a drop you feel limitations. If your hand is cut off, your legs are cut off, you always feel that you are Beryl. You are not the hand, not the body; it is the mind that makes you think you are limited.

Baba called for a hat, a pillow, a pen, a box and a notebook, and continued the discourse:

Here is Beryl, the Infinite, in the shape of a hat. Beryl is unlimited, she is infinite. There is no end to her. But Beryl eats, drinks, does everything through these layers [five senses].

(Baba pointed to the notebook, pen and box on the pillow.) What is required is that Beryl, instead of doing things in this outer direction (crown of the hat), turns inwardly and sees everything as infinite. Just a turn (Baba turned the hat around inside out so that it opened to the opposite side), and she sees herself as infinite. If you drop one layer, there is another and so forth. You continue to see illusion through the layers. If you take a complete turn, you experience yourself as infinite. (Baba put the hat on to everyone’s delight.)

Now, the point is, how should Beryl do this? It is impossible, because since millions of births she has formed the habit of looking in one direction. Just as when you are born, you see what is in front of you and continue to see it and take it for granted. The most you can do is through your own efforts or through the guidance of walis on the path, to change your angle of vision slightly. You will not take a complete turn, but you will shift your vision. Let us have a demonstration to make it clear. I have not explained this in India.

This is the gross plane (pointing to the notebook). This is the subtle plane (pointing to the box). You have formed the habit of seeing the gross world through the gross plane. Now, if Beryl contacts a wali (fifth plane mental-conscious master), he cannot help her to turn around [inside], but he can help her to take a step backwards and see through the subtle plane. The gross world is out of sight (Baba removed the notebook). But a Perfect Master makes her jump and she turns around completely and that is the end. With the help of a Perfect Master, she does not need to step back to go forward.

The explanation gives me a big headache. Actually it does happen this way. Those on the subtle plane have different experiences from those on the gross plane. The angle of vision completely changes, but all that is still illusion. On the mental plane, you see wonderful things. Your vision changes and you see illusion from a different angle. But you have to go beyond illusion. The gross, the subtle, the mental and God are all here. Don’t think that the gross, the subtle and mental are higher or lower than each other – all are here. It is your own angle of vision that makes the difference. You begin to see more deeply into the subtle, then more deeply into the mental sphere; and then you do a complete turn around and see yourself as infinite. Nothing remains but yourself.

Have you any idea of that bliss? It is continual, without a break, everlasting, never-changing.

Don Stevens says: “Baba, your explanations are superb, really superb!” But you have no idea about explanations. All is not explained in so simple a manner. How infinitely superb to see me as I really am! Only love can bring you to me!

Lord Meher, American ed., Bhau Kalchuri, Vol. 15, pp. 5413 – 5414.