HE SUFFERED FROM SELF-DELUSION

Cyrus Daily Messages

(March 1955) Daily, Eruch and Bhau had to leave Rosewood for the Judge’s bungalow at 5 A.M. to attend to Baba’s personal work. Baba ordered Krishnaji to bring tea each day at 6:30 A.M. from Rosewood for Kaikobad, Eruch, Sidhu, Ali Shah, Nilkanth and Bhau. He did as ordered, but brought tea for everyone except Bhau, for whom he felt disdain. Baba was very particular about this. When the tea arrived, Bhau was tidying up Baba’s room, and Baba asked him to go and have tea. So, Bhau went to Krishnaji, who said, “I have not brought tea for you!”

Bhau quietly returned to his work in Baba’s room, but Baba asked, “Have you had your tea?”

“Krishnaji did not bring it for me,” he replied.

Baba asked Krishnaji the reason, and he promised to bring it from the following day. But Baba persisted, “Why didn’t you bring it today?”

“I forgot!” But this was a lie.

Baba warned him not to be disobedient. From the next day, he started bringing tea for Bhau, but the duty was intolerable to him. Until this point, Bhau had been like his servant; now Krishnaji had to bring Bhau’s tea. It was humiliating! At first, he was respected; now he was given common work. His beard and long hair had also disappeared, and he took it all badly. No one with an inflated ego could stay with Baba. Only those who surrendered to and lost themselves in him could endure. For Krishnaji, it was impossible, because he suffered from self-delusion and he was adept at posing as a saint. He wanted to be treated as a Guru. One day, he told Baba, “I want to leave for a few days.”

Baba at once gestured, “Yes, go! Go now!” Krishnaji was made to leave within the hour, and thereafter, Baba never kept him with the mandali again. He came twice or thrice to visit, but Baba would not allow him to stay with him or the mandali. (1) 

(1) After this period in Satara, Krishnaji set himself up as a swami in Delhi, and became known as “liberator of the prostitutes.” Years later he settled in California, where he reputedly gathered a group of followers around him. He also imitated Meher Baba by using an alphabet board to communicate with people. Meher Baba’s followers were eventually warned to stay away from him.

Lord Meher, American  ed., Bhau Kalchuri, Vol. 14, p. 4916.