AS USUAL, BABA SPENT MORE TIME IN CONTACTING MASTS THAN IN RELAXING

Cyrus Daily Messages

After completing his mast work in Ahmedabad, Baba went to the station to catch a train for Mount Abu. Since there was plenty of time before the train was due to arrive and Baba was completely exhausted, he wished to rest for a while. However, the platform was full of people, so he could not rest there.

Baba climbed the railway bridge to see if he could find a quiet spot on which to lie down. He noticed a garden nearby, and when Eruch went to check it out, he found that it was a public works storehouse. Eruch asked the watchman permission for them to rest in the shade awhile, but he said, “This is a restricted area; no one is allowed inside.”

Entreatingly, Eruch told him, “We only want to lie underneath a tree before our train comes. I promise we will not be in your way. We are very tired and will leave after a few hour’s rest.”

The watchman reluctantly agreed and Eruch gave him a generous tip. Baba and the men carried their luggage to the garden and spread themselves out in the cool shade under a tree. Baba washed his face and hands. The men, after taking off their clothes, went to sleep. Since it was very hot at the time, they all slept in their underpants. Soon after, the official storekeeper himself showed up and asked the watchman, “Who are those people and why did you allow them to camp inside? Who will be responsible if anything is stolen?” The watchman implored his pardon, but harshly reprimanding him, the official said, “Your service terminates as of tomorrow. You’re fired!”

Baba was listening to all this, and he woke Eruch and said, “Go and find out what the trouble is.” Eruch ran half-naked to the guard, but the official had already left.

The watchman told him everything and Eruch consoled him, saying, “Don’t worry, we’ll do something.” Eruch, still in his underwear, then went to see the official storekeeper in the dak bungalow and told him in English, “It was not the watchman’s fault. We were wrong to seek shelter here. He at first refused us entrance, but on our persuasion he agreed.

“I am the son of a boiler inspector (a high rank) and all my companions come from good families. We will leave the garden now, but please do not dismiss the watchman because of us. We were simply lying under a tree and never stepped foot in the store.”

The official said, “You may rest there as long as you like. I was just threatening the man to keep him on his toes so he won’t permit anyone else to enter the premises. I won’t fire him.”

“Then kindly accompany me and assure him of that,” Eruch requested. “He is so afraid, and my elder brother won’t be able to rest so long as the man keeps worrying.”

The storekeeper took Eruch back in his car to the garden. Pretending to reprimand the watchman, he said, “If this ever happens again, I will dismiss you from service, but today you’re forgiven. Just remember not to let it happen again; otherwise, you’ll really lose your job.”

Thus everything returned to normal, but the Lord of the universe could not rest, even under the shade of a tree. Perhaps his fatigue was a pretext to contact the kindly watchman and his boss.

Baba departed for Mount Abu, arriving on the 25th of September (1947). One of the reasons Baba went to Mount Abu was to rest at the pleasant hill station, but as usual, Baba spent more time in contacting masts in the area than in relaxing.

Lord Meher, American ed., Bhau Kalchuri, Vol. 9, pp. 3195 – 3196.